Jan 152015
 

There is no private organization that administers and regulates the sport of boxing as the NCAA does for college sports or as the NFL, NBA, NHL and MLB do for professional sports. For many decades, there has been a wide range of rules and policies governing boxing competition. States, Indian tribes, boxing federations, fight promoters and TV networks have all influenced boxing regulations for their own benefit. This sport has long been associated with the exploitation of boxers, corrupt judges and self-serving unscrupulous promoters. Critics claim the questionable outcomes of many matches and the inexplicable rankings of some contenders, apparently designed to push the careers of certain fighters, are examples of this corruption. Boxing critics say this sport lost credibility with the public long ago. They say boxing is long overdue for regulations which set uniform standards for fight contracts, contender rankings, qualifications of referees and judges, and requiring states to accept each other’s decisions. The also say that more must be done to protect the health of boxers.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current boxing policy

I support establishing the U.S. Boxing Administration to protect the general interests of boxers, ensure uniformity, fairness and integrity in professional boxing, oversee all professional boxing matches, ensure that professional boxing laws are enforced, and wish to identify a legislator who will reintroduce H.R.1065 – United States Boxing Commission Act (109th Congress 2005-2006

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Admissions by many current and former professional baseball players have shown how rampant the use of performance enhancing drugs (PED) is in this sport. PEDs include steroids and human growth hormone (HGH) but there are many more. Professional athletes in football, track and field, hockey and cycling are also known to have used PEDs which aid in building muscle, oxygenating blood and recovering from injuries. Using steroids is illegal unless prescribed by a doctor for a known medical condition. However, PEDs are easily obtained from the Internet, unscrupulous doctors or from over-the-counter pharmacies in Mexico and other Latin American countries. Steroids are proven to increase muscle mass, especially when combined with proper nutrition and strength training, but they can also cause muscle-tendon injuries and have serious side-effects. These include heart and liver damage, endocrine system problems, elevated cholesterol levels, strokes, aggressive behavior and the shrinkage and dysfunction of genitalia. All our major sports leagues and the International Olympic Committee test their athletes for PEDs. However, HGH is currently undetectable and newly-developed “designer steroids” often evade detection until testing methods catch up with these new substances. New genetically engineered PEDs are soon expected to complement the current group of steroid and hormone supplements. Some claim that since PEDs are so prevalent, we should legalize these drugs and enjoy their contributions to player performance and the spectacle of sport. They say that PEDs could then be safely dispensed under medical supervision. Others maintain the use of PEDs is cheating, sets a bad example for our youth, tarnishes the achievements of those who do not use, and is harmful to those who do.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current performance enhancing drug policy

I support prohibiting a major professional league from arranging, promoting, organizing, or producing a professional game without first testing for the use of performance enhancing drugs (PED) by professional athletes and for public disclosure of the names of athletes who test positive; requiring the suspension of an athlete for a minimum of two years for the first violation, and a lifetime ban for the second violation for being caught using PEDs; allowing a league to impose a lesser penalty if the athlete: establishes that he did not know or suspect he had used the prohibited substance; or provides substantial assistance to the league in identifying violations of the league’s drug testing policy by other athletes or by any personnel working with or treating athletes, and wish to identify a legislator who will reintroduce S.1114 & H.R.2565 – Clean Sports Act of 2005 (109th Congress 2005-2006)

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill to legalize the use of performance enhancing drugs by professional athletes

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

The stakes are high for today’s aspiring athletes. The rewards for being big, strong, quick and fast entice some kids to “get an edge” on competition. Performance-enhancing drugs (PED) include anabolic steroids which build muscle mass by stimulating protein growth, and human growth hormones which stimulate natural sex steroids such as testosterone and estrogen, also to increase body mass. Recent surveys have documented the use of these illegal and unapproved drugs by American high school athletes. Recent studies have also found these drugs are increasingly being used by this age group to improve appearance. Advocates warn there have not been any studies to determine the safe or long-term consumption levels of PEDs for children. All PEDs have adverse side effects and many advocates believe the use of these drugs will shorten one’s lifespan. Studies have found that up to 12% of boys and 3% of girls are using anabolic steroids in high school. Most of these students began using at 16 and many have done multiple cycles. Studies have also found that nearly 4% of our middle school students, ages 9 to 13, are using steroids. In 1995, our Supreme Court ruled that PED testing for high school athletes is constitutional. Supporters say that testing serves as a deterrent and also offers students a way to say no to these dangerous drugs.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current youth sports performance enhancing drug policy

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill establishing a program to research the use of performance-enhancing drugs by junior high and high school athletes; and funding educational substance abuse prevention and intervention programs, including drug testing, related to the use of PEDs for students in this age group

 Posted by at 12:00 am