Jan 152015
 

Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) are trained to respond quickly to emergency situations involving medical issues, trauma injuries and accidents. These first responders, either professionals or volunteers, assist fire departments, ambulance services and rescue teams in stabilizing patients before transporting them to hospitals. EMTs are trained in basic life support techniques which include cardiopulmonary resuscitation, defibrillation, controlling bleeding, preventing shock, body immobilization to prevent spinal damage, and splinting bone fractures. There is currently a nationwide shortage of EMTs due to budget cuts in many states. Many rural communities without full-time EMT professionals rely on volunteer EMTs. These volunteers face unique challenges including low population densities and call volumes, ambiguous geographic boundaries, longer response and transport times, a lack of acute care facilities, and the need to communicate over remote areas.

Pending Legislation:

H.R.235 – Veteran Emergency Medical Technician Support Act of 2013

H.R.1009 – Volunteer Emergency Services Recruitment and Retention Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current Emergency Medical Technicians policy and wish to defeat H.R.235 and H.R.1009

I support establishing a demonstration program for states with a shortage of emergency medical technicians to streamline state requirements and procedures to assist veterans who completed military EMT training while serving in the Armed Forces to meet state EMT certification, licensure, and other requirements, and wish to pass H.R.235

I support tax incentives to recruit and retain voluntary EMTs by allowing sponsors of certain deferred compensation plans to elect to include length of service award plans for bona fide volunteers providing firefighting and fire prevention services, emergency medical services, ambulance services, and emergency rescue services; directs the Secretary of Labor to issue regulations exempting a length of service award program from treatment as an employee pension benefit plan, and wish to pass H.R.1009

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

At least 20 million Americans do not have health insurance. Most of these people are forced to use hospital emergency rooms as their primary source of medical care. The majority of our nation’s emergency rooms loose hundreds of millions of dollars each year and many have closed for this reason. In human terms, ER patients often wait long periods of time before receiving treatment while others are unable to receive treatment at all. In 2006, at least 500,000 ambulances were diverted to distant hospitals due to overcrowding at local ERs. Trauma injuries account for 42 million emergency room visits and 2 million hospital admissions every year. The costs of these injuries and illnesses are estimated to be more than $400 billion annually, not counting the deaths of nearly 180,000 Americans. From 1990 to 2009, the number of urban-area emergency rooms decreased 27%, from 2,446 to 1,77 -even though ER visits rose by 35% during this time. Data shows that ERs with low profit margins and those at for-profit facilities were nearly twice as likely to close as other ERs. Experts say that we do not have enough emergency room facilities. They claim these assets are woefully inadequate to treat large numbers of victims from a natural disaster or terror attack.

Pending Legislation:

S.380: Children’s Recovery from Trauma Act

H.R.2660 – Trauma Relief Access for Universal Medical Assistance Act

I oppose reforming current emergency room policy and wish to defeat S.380 and H.R.2660

I support reauthorizing and updating the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative for grants to address the problems of children who experience trauma and violence related stress, and wish to pass S.380

I support making supplemental appropriations for the Department of Health and Human Services for awarding grants to States to promote universal access to trauma care services provided by trauma centers and trauma-related physician specialties; allocating $100,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2014 through 2018, and wish to pass H.R.2660

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Since 1798, the Public Health Service (PHS) has been responsible for promoting the protection and advancement of our population’s physical and mental well-being. PHS agencies coordinate and implement national health policy on the state and local levels, conduct medical research, and ensure the safety of drugs, food and cosmetics. Its agencies include the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In some states, as much as 70% of their public health services are funded by PHS grants, including those for emergency preparedness, immunizations, laboratory services, epidemiology, disease surveillance and health promotion. However, due to federal and state budget cuts, we’ve eliminated an estimated 42,000 public health employee positions in the past 10 years. These cuts have also produced tens of billions of dollars in annual shortfalls of critical public health programs, affecting local vaccination programs, health department infrastructure maintenance, chronic disease programs, research projects, and testing for outbreaks of food-borne illness. Some claim last year’s Dallas Ebola debacle was a result of poorly-trained and unpracticed hospital procedures due, in part, to PHS budget cuts.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current public health services policy

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill to restore and make permanent the 2004 level of funding for Public Health Service agencies and programs, and to index this funding level to the rate of inflation

 Posted by at 12:00 am