Jan 152015
 

Most Social Security benefits are paid to older Americans who have contributed a portion of their lifetime wages into this retirement fund. These benefits are currently calculated using the CPI-W, or the Consumer Price Index for urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers. This process analyzes the price change in a “basket” of goods and services these workers typically purchase. The resulting increase or decrease of these prices over time reflects the amount of inflation in our economy. To counteract the effects of inflation, our Social Security Administration periodically increases benefits by what it calls Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA). Not long ago, our current administration proposed using a different CPI, Chained CPI, to set COLA increases for these benefits. Studies show this method would reduce Social Security benefit increases but would save the government $13 billion/year. Also, advocates claim the CPI basket of goods and services used to calculate inflation is different for the elderly than it is for younger consumers. Studies have shown a much higher rate of inflation for essentials such as housing and healthcare on which seniors spend much of their income. Advocates say seniors need their own CPI for Social Security benefits to keep pace with inflation.

Pending Legislation:

H.R.1585 – Guaranteed 3% COLA for Seniors Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current Consumer Price Index and wish to defeat H.R.1585

I support directing Department of Labor to prepare and publish a monthly Consumer Price Index for Elderly Consumers that indicates changes over time in expenditures for consumption which are typical for individuals in the United States age 62 or older; amending title II (Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance) of the Social Security Act to: require the use of such index to compute cost-of-living increases for Social Security benefits; and to provide, in the case of individuals who have attained age 62, for an annual cost-of-living increase of at least 3%, and wish to pass H.R.1585

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill to use Chained

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

According to the World Health Organization, elder abuse is “a single, or repeated act, or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust, which causes harm or distress to an older person.” This harm is usually committed by a person known to the victim, such as a spouse, partner, family member, friend, neighbor or those on which the older person relies on for services. In addition to neglect or abandonment, the abuse of elders can be physical, emotional or financial. In 2010, nearly 6 million elderly Americans, or 10% of our elderly population, were abused in some way. Two-thirds of these abuse victims were white females whose median age was 78. About 60% of all elderly abuse cases involved neglect, while physical abuse accounted for about 16% of these cases, followed by financial abuse (12%). In roughly two-thirds of these cases, the perpetrator of the abuse was an adult child or a spouse of the victim. More than 40% of all murder victims older than 60 are murdered by their own child or killed by a spouse (24%).

Pending Legislation:

S.1019 – Elder Protection and Abuse Prevention Act

S.975 – Court-Appointed Guardian accountability and Senior Protection Act

I oppose reforming current elder abuse policy and wish to defeat S.1019 and S.975

I support improving the capacity of state and local adult protective services programs to respond effectively to abuse, neglect, and exploitation of vulnerable adults, including home care consumers and residents of long-term care facilities; increasing public awareness of elder abuse and financial exploitation, and removing barriers to elder abuse education, prevention, investigation, treatment and the reporting of elder abuse; requiring an entity that receives a grant for an older individuals’ protection from violence project to use it to research and replicate successful models of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation prevention and training; awarding grants and entering into contracts with eligible organizations to carry out projects to engage volunteers over 50 years of age in providing support and information to older adults (and their families or caretakers) who have experienced or are at risk of elder abuse, and wish to pass S.1019

I support awarding grants to the highest courts of states to conduct demonstration programs that assess adult guardianship and conservatorship proceedings, including the appointment and the monitoring of the performance of court-appointed guardians and conservators; and implementing changes deemed necessary as a result of these assessments, such as mandating background checks for all potential guardians and conservators, and establishing systems that enable electronic filing and review of the annual accountings and other required conservatorship and guardianship filings, and wish to pass S.975

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

More than 11 million Americans need long-term care to assist them with performing essential every-day tasks. About 60% of this growing group of Americans is over the age of 65. Childhood disabilities, adult injuries, chronic illness and the aging process all contribute to the increasing need for adequate long term care. Medicaid helps states provide nursing home care for many of these people. Nursing homes and community-based settings such as assisted-living facilities provide registered nurses, licensed rehabilitation therapists, and home health aides employed by certified agencies. Home healthcare services may also be delivered to the homes of elderly, disabled or ill persons in need of medical, nursing, social or therapeutic treatment. Long term care services are usually paid by Medicare and private insurance companies. As our baby boom generation ages, perhaps 30 million more Americans will either choose or be forced to seek long term care. As insurance companies scramble to capture as much of this market as possible, there have been inevitable disputes with policyholders. Advocates say our elderly can be vulnerable to the unscrupulous tactics used by the representatives of these companies.

Pending Legislation:

S.998 – Home Care Consumer Bill of Rights Act

I oppose reforming current long term care policy and wish to defeat S.998

I support allowing third-party reviews of disputes from long term care policyholders by: requiring such an insurance issuer to develop and implement claims dispute resolution procedures that shall be designed to expeditiously resolve claim disputes; providing for the application of one or more alternative means of dispute resolution involving independent third-party review under appropriate circumstances by entities that are mutually acceptable to the issuer and the enrollee involved, with the decision of such reviewer being binding on the issuer, and wish to pass S.998

 Posted by at 12:00 am