Jan 152015
 

Immigrant workers, often their family’s only means of support, arrive in the U.S. isolated by language, culture and geography. They face many problems when living in a new country such as exploitation in the workplace, discrimination in host communities, and lack of access to human services. Their immigration status can be used by unscrupulous employers who take advantage of their susceptibility to deportation. They are denied the basic constitutional protections that U.S. citizens take for granted. In some states, undocumented immigrants are not eligible for workman’s compensation and have no recourse against job discrimination. In the past, deportation proceedings used to be a lengthy process, but new Department of Homeland Security rules have streamlined this procedure and in most cases deportations now occur quite rapidly. Advocates say undocumented immigrants should be granted legal rights including representation and due process in immigration hearings involving admissibility, removal and asylum cases, and also in criminal and civil cases that involve parole, bail and child custody.

Immigration advocates say the latest example of an immigrant rights issue is the recent surge of undocumented, unaccompanied child immigrants. The 2008 Trafficking Victims Protection Act requires child migrants who aren’t from Mexico to be placed with a relative or in foster care while their due process rights are exercised. Some wish to amend this law to allow expedited deportations of these children. Others disagree and believe most of these children are refugees, escaping endemic violence in their native countries. Advocates say our nation’s history is filled with countless examples of sheltering such refugees and that our laws rightfully allow these children to file applications for asylum.

Pending Legislations:

S.645 & H.R.1365 – Refugee Protection Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current immigrant rights policy and wish to defeat S.645 & H.R.1365

I support eliminating the one-year time limit for filing an asylum claim or reopening a claim that was denied because of failure to file within one year; authorizing the Attorney General to appoint counsel to represent an alien in a removal proceeding; prohibiting an alien from being removed during the 30-day petition for review period unless the alien indicates in writing that he or she wishes to be removed before the expiration of such period; setting forth protections for refugees, aliens interdicted at sea, and stateless persons in the United States including mechanisms for regularizing status, and wish to pass S.645 & H.R.1365

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Many employers claim there is a shortage of workers in our nation. They say industries such as agriculture, nursing and the service industries have job openings that cannot be filled by U.S. citizens. They claim this labor shortage will hurt our global competitiveness and inhibit innovation and job growth. Guest workers are one solution to this problem. Under guest worker programs, people of foreign origin are temporarily invited into our country to work. Many employers say our policies should encourage the legal flow of high and low-skilled workers to keep our country competitive. The L-1 (inner-company transfers of foreign managers/executives) and H-1B (temporary employment of foreign workers in specialty occupations) are non-immigrant visa classifications. Guest worker opponents claim these programs are being exploited by employers who import guest workers for a certain job then transfer these workers to unapproved jobs, taking positions that Americans could fill. They also say guest workers often remain here illegally after their work permit expires.

Pending Legislations:

H.R.1773: AG Act

H.R.1760: Immigration and Naturalization Investment Ventures for Engineering, Science, and Technology in America Act of 2013

I oppose Reforming current guest worker policy and wish to defeat H.R.1773 & H.R.1760

I support establishing an H-2C nonimmigrant visa for an alien having a residence in a foreign country which he or she has no intention of abandoning and who is coming temporarily to the United States to perform agricultural labor or services; extending to these workers basic legal protections and better working conditions; prohibiting the admission of these worker’s spouses and children; offering financial incentives for workers to return home upon expiration of their visas, and wish to pass H.R.1773

I support providing conditional permanent resident status for an alien entrepreneur (and spouse and children) who is in the process of completing, or has completed, a graduate level degree in science, technology, engineering, math or a related academic discipline from an accredited U.S. institute of higher education; or is in the process of establishing a new business related to such study that meets specified employment and wage requirements and is admissible as an immigrant, And wish to pass H.R.1760

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

It is estimated there are nearly 12 million undocumented workers living here today. These people include nearly 25% of all workers in private households, at least 25% of all restaurant workers and more than 75% of all farmworkers. Studies have shown that undocumented immigrants contribute at least $150 billion to our economy each year. Undocumented workers also pay Social Security taxes but are not eligible to collect Social Security benefits. Most economists say immigrants, those here legally or not, benefit our overall economy. Polls have shown that 75% of all Americans believe that granting undocumented immigrants legal status would be good for our economy. Amnesty supporters claim many undocumented immigrants are doing important jobs no one here wants to do. They say that undocumented workers do not compete with skilled laborers, but rather complement them. This is because economies work best when workers become specialized and divide up tasks among themselves, thus eliminating the need for skilled workers to spend time doing unskilled jobs. In states with many undocumented workers, studies show that from 1990 to 2007, undocumented workers increased legal worker’s pay in complementary jobs by up to 10%. However, studies also show that undocumented workers tend to lower the wages of unskilled native-born workers by about 5%. Amnesty supporters claim legalizing undocumented workers will improve the working conditions of their occupations and will help them educate themselves, get better jobs and increase their contributions to society. Opponents claim an amnesty program will encourage more illegal immigration and is unfair to those trying to legally immigrate.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current immigrant amnesty policy

I support providing legal permanent resident status for: certain undocumented or nonimmigrant aliens who are alien workers in an employee-shortage occupation and sponsored by a labor organization; those eligible for admission at a U.S. institution of higher education or are at least 65 years old, and wish to identify a legislator who will either reintroduce H.R.604 Worker Amnesty and Opportunity Act of 2003 (108th Congress 2003-2004), or a similar version thereof

 Posted by at 12:00 am