Jan 152015
 

DREAM Act is an acronym for the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act. This nickname was given to past legislation that attempted to legalize the status of an estimated 1.8 million young people living in America who were brought here as children by undocumented immigrant parents, many at a very young age. Most of these children have grown up thinking they were U.S. citizens only to discover their assumptions were in error when they applied for a driver’s license or social security card. These “illegal” Americans, many of whom have graduated from our schools and served in our military, are subject to deportation should they be detained by immigration or law enforcement officials. Most of these young people have never known any home other than America and are not familiar with the country they would be deported to. The Obama administration has suspend deportations of Dream kids. However, this action does not alter or confer lawful immigration status to an individual or provide them a path to citizenship.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current DREAM ACT policy

I support giving citizenship to undocumented children who have grown up in the U.S. and authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to cancel the removal of, and adjust to conditional permanent resident status, an alien who entered the United States before his or her 16th birthday and has been present in the United States for at least five years immediately preceding enactment of this Act; is a person of good moral character and is not inadmissible or deportable under specified grounds of the Immigration and Nationality Act; at the time of application, has been admitted to an institution of higher education or has earned a high school or equivalent diploma; from the age of 16 and older, has never been under a final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal; and was under age 35 on the date of this Act’s enactment, and wish to identify a legislator who will reintroduce S.729 – Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act of 2009 (111th Congress 2009-2010)

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Nearly two-thirds of all undocumented immigrants have lived in the U.S. for at least 10 years and nearly half are parents of minor children. Additionally, a large number of immigrant households are composed of mixed status families where one or both parents are non-citizens and one or more children are citizens. Undocumented immigrant families face many challenges including the trauma of migration, adjusting to a new culture, fear, poverty, finding work and the inability to access social services. Federal data shows that almost one in four people deported in 2010 was the mother or father of an American citizen. Child advocates claim that as deportation rates increase, so does the number of children from immigrant families placed in foster care. It is estimated that more than 5,000 children are currently living in foster care because their immigrant parents have been either detained or deported. In many cases these families never reunite. Advocates say Child Protective Service workers are reluctant to undertake reunification efforts when a parent is facing deportation or has been deported. Often, most don’t have the language skills to communicate with immigrant parents and are not aware of help offered by the Mexico Consulate in locating deported parents.

Pending Legislation:

H.R.406 – To provide discretionary authority to an immigration judge to determine that an alien parent of a United States citizen child should not be ordered removed, deported, or excluded from the United States

I oppose reforming current immigrant family policy and wish to defeat H.R.406

I support amending the Immigration and Nationality Act, in the case of an alien subject to removal, deportation, or exclusion and who is the parent of a U.S. citizen child, to authorize an immigration judge to decline to order such removal if the judge determines such action to be against the child’s best interests, and wish to pass H.R.406

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Undocumented American immigrants are drawn to the armed forces for the same reasons native-born Americans are. These include a steady job, the military lifestyle and patriotism. Many undocumented immigrants who join the U.S. military erroneously assume that citizenship goes along with enlisting. Policy changes by the Department of Homeland Security have made it much easier and faster for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Service (ICE) to deport undocumented people, including military veterans. Our government has already deported 12,000 military veterans. ICE agents are supposed to take into account military service before making a decision to deport a veteran. ICE is also supposed inform the vet that he has the right to apply for citizenship even while being processed for deportation. Under a 1990’s law, a legal resident, including U.S. military veterans, can have their legal residency revoked and be deported if convicted of a crime, including crimes that occurred years earlier and for which the offender has served his sentence. Veterans facing deportation are still entitled to various educational and medical benefits but advocates say most don’t get the chance to use them because immigration officials are very aggressive in their efforts to deport undocumented people, regardless of whether they are veterans or not.

Pending Legislation:

S.1059 – A bill to amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to deem any person who has received an award from the Armed Forces of the United States for engagement in active combat or active participation in combat to have satisfied certain requirements for naturalization

I oppose reforming current immigrant veterans policy and wish to defeat S.1059

I support amending the Immigration and Nationality Act to deem any person who has received an award from the U.S. Armed Forces for engagement in active combat or active participation in combat to have satisfied specified naturalization requirements, and wish to pass S.1059

 Posted by at 12:00 am