Jan 152015
 

Loopholes in the Animal Welfare Act have allowed cockfighting to exist and grow. Cockfighting is only legal in Louisiana, Oklahoma and New Mexico but its legal status in these states encourages cockfighting in other states as well, giving enthusiasts in outlawed states an excuse to own these fighting birds and associated gear. Stimulants, blades and blood-clotting drugs for cockfighting birds are readily available online. During cockfights, metal blades are strapped to the legs of these combatants so they can inflict maximum damage on their opponent, and roosters often fight each other to the death. Animal welfare advocates claim the deaths and injuries of many animals are committed under the guise of entertainment and for the promotion of gambling. Proponents claim “chickens do naturally fight” and are against further federal restrictions and penalties.

Pending Legislations:

S.666 & H.R.366 – Animal Fighting Spectator Prohibition Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current cockfighting policy and wish to pass S.666 & H.R.366

I support punishing any person for knowingly attending an animal fighting venture with a fine and/or imprisonment for up to a year for each violation; and who knowingly causes a minor to attend such venture to be punished by a fine and/or imprisonment for up to three years for each violation, and wish to pass S.666 & H.R.366

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Wild animals including Raccoon, Muskrat, Mink, Beaver, Coyote, Red Fox and Opossum are harvested for their fur and are often caught with leg traps. Anti-fur advocates contend the steel jaw leg-hold trap is a painful, inhumane and nonselective way to trap animals. Animals caught in this trap often further injure themselves trying to escape before finally dying. Even if released, they may perish later from internal injuries or reduced ability to hunt or forage for food. It is estimated that these traps catch and kill two unwanted animals for every animal that is targeted. In a 1981 study, non-targeted animals comprised 76% of all animals captured in steel jaw leg-hold traps. These animals include golden and bald eagles, hawks and other birds, rabbits, sage grouse, family pets, deer, antelope, porcupines, sheep and calves.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current fur trapping policy

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill to ban the use of steel-jawed leg-hold traps

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Apes are the closest relatives to humans in the animal world, sharing more than 96% of their DNA with us. The great apes, including gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans, are now in danger of extinction. Poachers shoot them, smugglers sell their babies as exotic pets, illegal loggers destroy the rain forests where they live, and civil wars drive them from their habitat. Along with elephants, apes are regarded as the ‘gardeners of the forests’ by spreading seeds and pruning branches. Today, there are believed to be about 400,000 great apes in Africa and Asia, compared to many millions in the 19th century. These species will become extinct within the next 15-20 years if action is not taken to halt their decline. Advocates say ape habitat must be protected, law enforcement must be given more resources to prevent smuggling, and countries inhabited by apes should be encouraged to regard them as an asset, making them the center of their tourism industries.

Pending Legislation:

H.R.1328 – Great Ape Conservation Reauthorization Amendments Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current great ape policy and wish to defeat H.R.1328

I support awarding a multi-year grant for long-term conservation strategy for great apes and their habitats including scientific research and findings related to conservation needs and priorities of great apes, including regional or species-specific action plans or strategies, and wish to pass H.R.1328

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Americans do not raise horses for human consumption as some other nations do. However, more than 100,000 American horses are annually transported to Canada and Mexico to be slaughtered for European consumption, where horsemeat is considered a delicacy. Because of the lack of disclosure on the part of slaughterhouse dealers, horses are often acquired and slaughtered through fraud and misrepresentation. Slaughter also provides a quick and evidence-free outlet for stolen horses. These animals are often subjected to extremely cruel transport and euthanasia conditions. In the past 20 years, more than 3 million American horses have met their fate this way.

Aside from being eaten, these magnificent animals face other kinds of cruelty including abuse and doping. Sometimes show and performing horses are abused by soring, which is the practice of pouring caustic chemicals, cutting or otherwise abusing a horse’s front hooves and lower legs to induce an accentuated high step. The gait, known as the “big lick,” is prized at Tennessee walking horse competitions. Race horses are sometimes given drugs, including anabolic steroids to run faster and longer. Advocates claim hard-to-detect steroids are a threat to the integrity of this sport because their effects, including an increase in muscle mass, can persist long after the substance has left the horse’s system. They say there is strong temptation to use steroids in a sport in which winners are decided by a nose.

Pending Legislations:

H.R.1518 – PAST Act

S.973 & H.R.2012 – Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current horses policy and wish to defeat H.R.1518 and S.973 & H.R.2012

I support prohibiting the sale, possession and trade of horseflesh for human consumption and wish to identify a legislator to reintroduce S.1176 – American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2011 (112th Congress 2011-2012)

I support licensing, training, assigning, and overseeing persons who are work for horse shows, exhibitions, sales, or auctions to detect and diagnose sore horses or otherwise inspect horses at such events; prohibiting showing, exhibiting, selling, or auctioning a Tennessee Walking, a Racking, or a Spotted Saddle horse with an action device or a weighted shoe, pad, wedge, hoof band, or other device or material if it is constructed to artificially alter the gait of such horses and is not strictly protective or therapeutic, and wish to pass H.R1518

I support allowing the Office of National Drug Control Policy to serve as the independent anti-doping organization with responsibility for: developing rules regarding substances, methods, and treatments that may and may not be administered to a horse participating in such a race; and excluding from participation in any such race any person who is determined to have violated such a rule or who is subject to a suspension from horse racing activities by any state racing commission, and wish to pass S.973 & H.R.2012

 Posted by at 12:00 am