Jan 152015
 

At least 75,000 violent crimes are committed by American youths each year. Many people believe the gratuitous violence depicted in our movies, television shows and video games is partly responsible for these crimes. Our government reports that by age 18, an average American youth has viewed more than 16,000 simulated murders and 200,000 acts of violence on TV. More than 800 of the 1,000 parents surveyed believe our media teaches violent and anti-social behavior in children. Most movie critics claim the quality of acting, screenwriting and character development has been sacrificed in favor of graphic violence and violent special effects. Advocates claim our movie industry has steadfastly refused to accept any responsibility for their complicity in desensitizing and glamorizing violence and aggressive behavior in our society.

Pending Legislation:

S.134 – Violent Content Research Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current media violence policy and wish to defeat S.134

I support directing the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications Commission, and the Department of Health and Human Services, jointly, to undertake to enter into appropriate arrangements with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a comprehensive study and investigation of whether there is a connection between exposure to violent video games and programming and harmful effects on children; requiring such investigation to consider whether such exposure causes children to act aggressively or causes other measurable harm to children, has a harmful effect on children already prone to aggressive behavior or on other identifiable groups of children, and causes effects distinguishable from other types of media; any identified harm has a direct and long-lasting impact on a child’s well-being; and current or emerging characteristics of video games have a unique impact on children, considering video games’ interactive nature and the personal and vivid way violence might be portrayed in such video games, and wish to pass S.134

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Merchants spend billions of dollars each year to advertise on television because audiences are effectively influenced by this medium. In much the same way, many claim, children and adults are also effectively influenced by the violence they see on that same medium. Our television industry is blamed for desensitizing violence and making aggressive behavior more acceptable in our society. Studies have found a high correlation between media violence and aggressive or violent behavior in children. It is estimated that by the time they finish elementary school, children who have watched 3-4 hours of TV a day have viewed more than 8,000 murders. By age 18, the average American child has viewed more than 200,000 acts of TV violence. A 17-year study found that watching television triggers aggressive responses -and not only in young children. Studies have found that by age 30, those who watched more than an hour of TV a day, whether or not they watched programs that were rated as violent, were nearly four times more prone to committing aggressive acts including robbery, battery, rape and murder as those limiting daily viewing to an hour or less. Television broadcasts are readily available to most children and many watch more than 3 hours of network or cable TV each day. At least half of all American children have a television in their bedroom. Child advocates believe that violent and adult programming, including violent cartoons, should not be broadcast during the time children are likely to view them.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current TV programming policy

I support prohibiting violent video programming during children’s viewing hours if the FCC determines v-chip rating and encoding is ineffective, and wish to identify a legislator who will reintroduce S.161 – Children’s Protection from Violent Programming Act (108th Congress 2003-2004

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Most parents wish to control their children’s viewing of mature-rated movies and TV programs. The violence-rated chip (v-chip) technology, which allows television sets to block violent-rated shows, is ineffective because media companies often do not rate their violent programming as violent. Studies have shown at least 70% of all violent programming is not specifically rated for violence. A study of TV-PG rated shows found nearly 11 incidents of explicit adult content per hour. The violence in these shows included “dismemberment, decapitation and animal abuse.” Critics claim our media’s age-based rating system is not a content-based rating system. They say age ratings are merely Hollywood’s and Madison Avenue’s idea of what is appropriate for our children. Critics claim studies have shown our media industry continues to deliberately market inappropriate material to children, regardless of its rating. According to one survey, American parents overwhelmingly prefer a simple ratings system that tells them what is in a program, rather than one that gives them advice on whether their children should be allowed to view it. Industry advocates claim these TV rating surveys are flawed and that most parents are satisfied with the current TV ratings system.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current TV ratings system policy

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill replacing our current television age-based ratings system with a content-based ratings system that includes descriptions of the content of television programs

 Posted by at 12:00 am