Jan 152015
 

Many old factories, foundries, plants and other manufacturing facilities have been abandoned after outgrowing their usefulness, going out of business, or succumbing to offshoring. Often polluted, these underutilized properties are called brownfield sites. These sites are usually contaminated with low levels of hazardous waste or pollution such as solvents, pesticides, lead and asbestos. The concentrations of these pollutants are too low to qualify as a Superfund site but the high cost of cleanup has prevented many local governments from doing so. Besides creating problems for the surrounding environment, these eyesores are blights on the landscape and obstacles for communities attempting to redevelop inner city areas.

Pending Legislations:

S.491 & H.R.2896 – Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act of 2013

I oppose reforming current brownfield sites policy and wish to defeat S.491 & H.R.2896

I support establishing a program to provide multipurpose grants to carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, or remediation activities at brownfield sites in a proposed area, giving consideration for grants to waterfront brownfield sites, and wish to pass S.491 & H.R.2896

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Cancer kills more children than any other disease. After accidents, cancer is the second leading cause of death for children under the age of 15. The incidence of childhood cancer continues to increase at the alarming rate of about 1% per year. Nearly 13,000 children are expected to get cancer in 2014, and more than 1,400 are expected to die. This is despite treatment advances that have enabled 80% of children with cancer to survive 5 years or more – up from 60% in the mid 70’s. However, the exact causes of childhood cancers are unknown. Health advocates say a child’s physiology and metabolism are much more sensitive to the harmful effects of pollution exposure than adults. It is suspected these cancers could result from environmental exposure to toxins such as pesticides, solvents, fire retardants or other household chemicals. Researchers are now studying whether others factors including parental exposure to radiation or chemicals, maternal diet during pregnancy, early postnatal feeding patterns and diet, or maternal reproductive history may be responsible for contributing to the increase in these cancers. There are now more than 360,000 survivors of childhood cancer. However, many of these children will face additional health problems growing up as a result of previously having cancer and the treatments required to cure it. More than 7 million American children also suffer from asthma, a disease that inflames and narrows the airways leading to, or within, the lungs. Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children under the age of 18. Much like cancer, the causes of asthma are not precisely known and its incidence is also on the rise, although asthma deaths occur much more often in adults than children.

Pending Legislations:

S.50 – Strengthening Protections for Children and Communities From Disease Clusters Act

H.R.1007: Asthma Management Plans in School Act

I oppose reforming current child pollution protection policy and wish to defeat S.50 and H.R.1007

I support investigating suspected or potential disease clusters, environmental pollutants or toxic substances associated with such clusters; establishing and operating Regional Disease Cluster Information and Response Centers and Regional Disease Cluster Information and Response Teams; authorizes any person to submit a petition to the EPA that requests that a Response Team conduct an investigation or take action to address the potential causes of disease clusters; authorizing grants to groups of individuals that may be affected by such clusters, and wish to pass S.50

I support awarding grants to schools for the development and implementation of asthma management plans, purchase asthma medications, devices and other supplies necessary for the relief and treatment of affected students, and wish to pass H.R.1007

 Posted by at 12:00 am
Jan 152015
 

Military bases are exempt from federal and state environmental regulations. Critics say these exemptions have encouraged our military to discharge large amounts of toxic materials into our air, ground and water. They say this exemption has prevented cleanup efforts and endangered many people living on or near these bases. They claim our military should not be allowed to use its right of sovereign immunity to pollute our land, water and air. Our military is the world’s largest polluter, annually generating nearly 800,000 tons of toxic material worldwide. Every year, more that one-third of our nation’s toxic waste is generated by our Armed Forces. It is estimated there are now 27,000 toxic hot spots located on 8,500 American military properties in need of remediation. Health advocates say the Pentagon’s low-priority policy regarding the cleanup of military base pollution is resulting in increased rates of cancer, kidney disease, birth defects and miscarriage for those on or near these facilities.

Pending Legislation: None

I oppose reforming current military site pollution protection policy

I support identifying a legislator who will sponsor a bill requiring military bases to conform to federal environmental pollution protection laws

 Posted by at 12:00 am